Starting a Family Farm in Vermont


Australian Lowline Angus —
September 14, 2006, 7:58 pm
Filed under: Cattle, Farming

   

Our Lowline Angus Cattle arrived last night! We got 4 heifers all of whom are bred for spring calves. They are great. Melissa and I became interested in the miniature breed of cattle last year. Since we want all of the cattle housed on our property the miniatures were very appealing to us.

Here are some miniature cattle facts — 

  • Cows and bulls measure between 36 and 44 inches at 3 years old
  • They are more docile than full size cattle
  • Consume 1/3 less feed and finish better on grass than full size
  • Ease of calving and great mothering skills
  • Diversified Usage – Milk, Beef, Breeding Stock, or Outdoor Pets
  • Fantastic quality of meat
  • Much easier on the land
  • Perfect for today’s smaller Family Farms.
  • Thanks again to Rod and Marilyn Hewitt of Dayspring Farm for all of your help! — John



Welcome Doubletake and Thunder!
September 10, 2006, 1:39 pm
Filed under: Cattle, Farming

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The first of our miniature cattle arrived today! Doubletake and Thunder. Double Take is a beautiful Registered Miniature Belted Galloway cow. She is currently pregnant. We purchased her along with her bull calf, Thunder. They came from Ministock Farm in Randolph, Vermont. 

Thunder will become the Farm’s herd bull. We are keeping our fingers crossed for at least one heifer out of the the last two pregnant cows from Ministock Farm. Since they will have different fathers it would be nice to secure a heifer for Thunder to breed.

 We are still waiting for our fence work to be completed before we get the rest of our cattle. Those will be the 4 Registerd Lowline Agnus heifers from Dayspring Farm. They are all bred, and the remaining Miniature Belted calves that are due soon. Please feel free to check out the new Video Page  I added to our site.    Enjoy — John



Barn or Ark???….
June 26, 2006, 4:48 pm
Filed under: Cattle, Construction, Pigs

This weather has been nothing short of horrible. The construction of the barn has been underway but there is no question that this rain isn’t helping us. We are using a talented local builder, John Newton, who actually built the home we are living in. Luckily we started the clearing for pastures when we did and they are finished. The logging was done by Will Crandall from Peru, VT. His crew did fantastic job. My wife Melissa and I did all of the electric fence work that would put a smile on Long Island’s finest —- Rose Fence.. The permanent fence work will be done by Springfield Fence of Springfield, VT. 

 As far as the animals go, we have moved what we have now to their new home located on Ridge Road in Landgrove,VT. It really was a sight watching Melissa walk our pig, Sugar, through the village of Landgrove to the new house. As most of you are aware from my previous blog, we are purchasing a Miniature Belted Galloway Bull, his mother, and are waiting for others to be born in July. We have also purchased 4 Lowline Angus heifers that we be pregnant when we get them. On July 4th I will be picking up 5 more piglets from Walter of Sugar Mountain Farm. If all goes as planned the farm should be in full operation by the end of the summer/ beginning of fall. I will be sure to keep everyone posted— John 



It’s a Bouncing Baby Bull!!
June 20, 2006, 4:15 pm
Filed under: Cattle

We received an email last week announcing the birth of a healthy bull calf born at Ministock Farm in Randolph VT. Melissa and I made our first trip to visit Jody and Robyn’s farm last fall when their Miniature Belted Galloways cows were pregnant. We were very interested in the breed and shook hands with them for first look at the calves after they were born. This bull was born on June 11th and will be a perfect fit for our Farm. Our goal with the miniature cattle is to keep a breeding stock and raise their offspring for Vermont raised, grass fed, hormone free beef. The local market is very good for this beef. If you have not eaten grass fed, I highly recommend it. It is fantastic. We have high hopes for this little bull’s future and will keep everyone posted on the future happenings at the farm— John 



Lowline Angus Cattle
June 5, 2006, 12:54 pm
Filed under: Cattle

 Lowline Angus Calf I took a small road trip with my youngest daughter Emma on Saturday to visit Rod and Marilyn Hewitt of Dayspring Farm in Rockingham, VT. I found their farm online while looking for Miniature Cattle breeders in Vermont. I have met with Rod several times over the last few months. He raises Dexter Cattle for grass fed beef and recently purchased a herd of Lowline Angus Heifers. We were very interested in the Dexters as well as the Lowlines. After seeing both breeds I became more intersted in the Lowlines. Rod decided that having so many Dexters and now adding the Lowlines to his farm was just going to be too much. He contacted me and asked if I would be interested in buying some. Melissa and I saw this as a great opportunity for our Farm and deceided to purchase 4 Lowline Angus heifers from him. The heifers will become pregnant this summer. We are still in the construction phase of the barn as well as the farm so we will be getting them when we are up and running. For more information on Lowlines visit Lowline Info.



Miniature Belted Galloways
April 29, 2006, 5:01 pm
Filed under: Cattle

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Today Melissa and I took a drive up to visit Jody and Robyn Richards from Ministock Farm in Randolph Vermont. We are getting our Miniature Belted Galloway Cattle from them. The calves are expected to be born this summer. We will be adding several calves and possibly a cow to start our herd. Our goal with cattle is to raise breeding stock, and in the future provide Naturally Raised Grass Fed Beef as well as Milk for our family and for sale. Miniature cattle are a unique breed. They have all the characteristics of full size cattle, but because of their size, they need less land and are much easier to handle than their larger cousins. As far as beef production goes, they are the perfect size for the family freezer and the quality of meat is excellent. The miniatures are perfect for today’s smaller farms and will be a natural fit on Asmall Farm.